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FAWWA Christmas Party

Posted by on Dec 9, 2013

Join us this Friday for the annual FAWWA Christmas party. This year students of the Imaginal Literacy Programme 2013, facilitated by Horst Kornberger, will share some of their work. Entry is free, with tea and coffee provided. Please bring something to eat or drink to put in the communal pot. 5pm Friday 13 December, Mattie Furphy House, Cpse Lane, Allen Park, Swanbourne All...

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WHO’S AVERSE TO CHRISTMAS?

Posted by on Dec 9, 2013

Join Well Versed at ‘The Hollow’ Amphitheatre Allen park, Swanbourne, near Tom Collins’ House Turn left into Clare Copse, off Kirkwood Street, for free parking. Sunday 15th December from 4.30 – 5.30pm admission $10 – door sales available To be sure of a seat, book with Jim and Alison on 9336 5945 or email:...

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A Very Busy Weekend at the FAWWA

Posted by on Nov 4, 2013

Afternoon Readings from the FAWWA Mentorship Program 2013 Please come along to an afternoon of readings by the mentees and a discussion of mentors and mentees re their experience of the program. It will run from 2 – 4 pm on Sunday November 10th and be followed by a delicious afternoon tea. Furphy Water Cart in Fremantle Festival Parade You are also urged to attend the Fremantle Festival Parade and see the newly restored Furphy Water Cart. Beginning at 4pm. Anyone interesting in helping out on the day please contact the office. Friday@Furphys This Friday the 8th at 5pm. We hope to see you...

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Show, Don’t Tell: Handling Exposition, Backstory and POV

Posted by on Sep 9, 2013

Stories do not come out of a void. There is much the reader needs to know about the time, setting, the characters and past events to enjoy and make sense of the story. How to handle this mass of details called exposition? Some storytellers write it on the nose- setting down facts about background, characters and events like a newspapers report. Others use awkward and unnatural contrivances. This workshop shows how exposition may be woven into the fabric of the story so the reader is scarcely aware of being given essential information, and will show how any writer may master the technique of elucidating exposition. This workshop will also cover Point Of View (POV) focusing on the three most common (1st person, 3rd person/omniscient, 3rd person proximate), showing the kind of story which each POV is most appropriate. Workshop...

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How to Write Dramatic Dialogue

Posted by on Sep 9, 2013

Join John Harman on Saturday October 26, 1.30 – 4.30pm. Good dialogue shows and expresses rather than tells. It makes the story fly. Of course, straightforward narrative can move the story forward and supply exposition (back-story) but dialogue is the high-octane fuel that propels the story and supplies much of its drama. it is sometimes difficult for writers to know when to employ dialogue instead of narrative (and vice versa) but appropriate and authentic dialogue lifts the story and gives it impetus, proving the premise, revealing character, progressing the plot and carrying exposition. Course Structure The five functions of dialogue What makes good dialogue Voice Revealing character through dialogue Exposition through dialogue Colour and texture Subtext. Don’t write every line ‘on the nose.’ Bad language. Be honest. If you do not want them to use it, do not create...

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How to Create Vivid, Believable Characters

Posted by on Sep 2, 2013

Join John Harman at Mattie Furphy House on Saturday 21st September for second workshop in the series, How to Writer and Publish a Novel. A story is a completed process of change which has the ability to move readers feelings powerfully and pleasurably (or painfully) in a definite way. But though the story may arise and progress out of causality (plot) it is our interest in… affinity with…horror at…the protagonist or antagonist that keeps us hooked. Frequently we remember characters long after we have forgotten the plot. A story may be structured like a journey with a compass – the premise… them…threads. A map – the plot. An engine – the motivation of the protagonist (and other central characters). Dialogue – the fuel of the story. Exposition – the territory through which the story travels. This means the depth,...

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